Posts Tagged ‘rice’

Captain’s Call Rice Cakes

DSCN1158 300x224 Captains Call Rice Cakes

Okay, this was in Panama… we sailed past the Galapagos in the dead of night but hey, islands.

The Galapagos.  Ever since reading the Kurt Vonnegut book I had wanted to sail there.  Almost every cruiser heading through the Panama Canal to the Marquesas stops off at the Galapagos.  It’s the logical stopping-point to break up the prodiigeous 4,000 nautical mile passage.  Sure, it’s a lot closer to Panama, about 845 nautical miles away.  But still, it’s a nice break  to help you remember what land feels like.

Toshi San and I both really wanted to go.  Mori San wouldn’t have minded either (provided there was a post office there, Mori San’s one requirement for visiting even the remotest of locations).  Unfortunately Sato San was dead set against it.  It was costly, there was a lot of paperwork, we might use up too much fuel, and he was in a bit of a hurry to reach Darwin for the start of the Sail Indonesia Rally in July.  Then there were the sea lions.  He’d heard horror stories from our friends in the previous WARC about sea lions climbing up on boats and making their noisy, stinky, aggressive selves at home.

Still, we were sailing within 10 nautical miles of the islands, near enough to smell them, without stopping.  Sadder still our friends on Spirit of Alcides were taking the time to stop and explore the islands.  But as much as Toshi San, Mori San, and I wanted to go, it wasn’t up to us.  Though crew may offer suggestions, a boat is not a democracy.  The captain always has the final say.

Though it can be frustrating, the captain really does have to have complete control of what goes on on a boat (this control does not extend to the galley.  I am captain of my galley.  It helps the boat run smoothly and keeps things together in rough seas or trying times.  Not that the captain has to be a Bligh or anything.  He can listen, but bottom line is that, the captain always has the final say.  Alas this meant I didn’t get to visit the Galapagos this time around.

I was on watch with Toshi San at 3:30 am when we sailed by.  Oh there was joking about “accidently” going off course and ending up there but no.   No giant turtles or blue footed boobies for us.  Not this time. I guess I have to save something for next time around.

DSCN1212 300x224 Captains Call Rice CakesThat morning we had left-over rice from the night before.  Rice is integral in Japanese cooking.    From the start Sato San made it clear that at least one meal of the day should be accompanied by rice.  I usually cook just the right amount.  But what happens when you make too much rice?

Growing up one of my favorite left over breakfasts was rice cakes.  Now “rice cake” can mean so many different things.  Of course there are the Styrofoam-like “healthy” rice cakes.  You know, the ones that taste like nothing unless they are flavored with some salt or seasoning?  Then there are Korean rice cakes which are similar to Japanese mochi.  These dense cylinders of  rice flour pressed into a chewy pasta are used in one of my favorite dishes, dduk boki.

 

These rice cakes are completely different.  They are more like rice pancakes.  They make an easy and tasty breakfast not to mention being  a wonderful way of using up left-over rice from the night before.

 

 

Captain’s Call Rice Cakes

Ingredients:

  • DSCN1211 300x225 Captains Call Rice Cakes3 c cooked rice
  • ¼ c spring onions, finely chopped
  • ½ c canned corn
  • ½ c fake crab meat, chopped (optional)
  • 2 T Vegeta seasoning
  • 4 eggs
  • Oil for frying
  • Okonomayaki sauce (optional)

Directions:

  • Put rice in large bowl
  • Mix in eggs, corn, fake crab meat, and vegeta
  • Scoop onto oiled skillet with ladle
  • Cook in oiled skillet over medium heat until golden, 2-3 minutes on each side
  • Serve hot

rice cake with okonomayaki 300x224 Captains Call Rice Cakes

Cruisers’ Ice Cream

DSCN9226 300x225 Cruisers Ice CreamI scream, you scream we all scream for ice cream.

And you’ll be screaming for quite a while at sea.  The one thing that I miss more than any other when sailing is ice cream.  Sure there are yachts with fabulous freezers, but generally they are filled with fish, meats, and other “necessary” frozen things

 

One of the first things I do when I hit land is scout out the nearest ice cream parlor.  Alas on small islands the ice cream isn’t usually the best but I’m an addict, what can I say?

Between ports though, on long passages, what’s a girl to do?  Make a substitute for ice cream.  That’s what.  I’ve been making versions of this Indian rice pudding for years.  Rich, creamy, and decadent, it is the best substitute for ice cream I’ve found.  I like to make a big batch before a long passage and pull it out of the bottom of the fridge on those hot days I’m dreaming of ice cream.

DSCN9188 300x225 Cruisers Ice CreamCruisers Ice Cream

Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ c rice
  • 2 c water
  • 1 c sugar
  • 2 c milk
  • 2 c coconut milk
  • 2 c water
  • 1 ½ t ground cardamom
  • 1 stick cinnamon
  • ½ c pistachios, chopped
  • 1 T rose water

Directions:

  • DSCN9192 300x225 Cruisers Ice Cream
  • Wash rice well and soak in water to cover generously for 15 minutes.
  • Drain
  • Put rice and water in pan and bring to boil for 5 minutes
  • Turn off heat and allow to steam 5 minutes
  • Stir in milk, water, coconut milk, cinnamon, and cardamom
  • Bring to a boil
  • Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking
  • Cook 45 minutes
  • Remove cinnamon stick
  • Stir in pistachiosDSCN9325 1024x768 Cruisers Ice Cream
  • Cool to room temperature. Mix in rosewater

 

Chill 24 hours

Reef Knot Rice Cakes

IMG 1453 1024x768 Reef Knot Rice Cakes

I hate mornings.  Not that I loathe the actual time of day.  Sunrise can be stunning, animals come out to play, and the world is bright and fresh.  No, what I despise is the actual getting out of bed portion of it.  Leaving your toasty covers for the chill air to shock you awake, and unless it’s sweltering out the air is always chilly compared to the nice pocket of warmth under the blankets.  That and the fact that I just don’t seem to function as well at that time of day.  No matter what time I go to sleep, 6 am is just early.

Unfortunately, as cook, I have to get out of bed before everyone else.  Nightwatch notwithstanding.  Because I lack the proclivity for mornings that some do I would much prefer to have something that doesn’t take terribly long to prepare and one way to do that is to work with leftovers.

I often try and have a bit of cooked rice around because, especially on a Japanese boat, the variety dishes that one can make with a little cooked rice are astounding.

“Rice for Breakfast?” a disbeliever asked me.

Rice for breakfast isn’t simply Asian.  Far from it, these rice pancakes are one of my childhood favorites.  Quick, easy, and requiring minimal preparation these pancakes are perfect boat food.   Sometimes I add a little corn or other veggies for variation.

Reef Knot Rice Pancakes

Serves 3

Ingredients:

  • 2 c cooked rice
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 t Vegeta or seasoned salt
  • 1 T butter (for frying)

Directions:

  • In medium bowl mix eggs, rice, and vegeta
  • Let stand 3 minutes
  • Melt half of butter in frying pan over medium heat
  • Spoon rice batter onto pan and fry each cake until golden brown on the bottom 2-3 minutes
  • Flip and cook until golden brown on the other side
  • Enjoy!

These rice cakes can be served hot or cold and are tasty either way

DSCN8843 1024x768 Reef Knot Rice Cakes