Posts Tagged ‘cruising’

Breakwater Breakfast Burritos

Umidori1 300x224 Breakwater Breakfast Burritos   “flot flot flot… flot flot flot…”

I was trying to get some sleep before my watch when I heard it.  Damn, another flying fish flew in the hatch, I thought.  I’ll just get it when I get up.  I promptly rolled over and went to sleep.

My alarm went off at 3:45 a.m. and I dressed for watch.  Just before going up, I went to the head (toilet) in my room to brush my teeth.

“Oh!” I cried, as I turned on the light.  A pigeon-sized dark-grey bird sat on the floor looking up at me.  I went outside and brought Mori San, who was just going off watch, in to see.  He must be one of the little dark birds we had seen flitting over the waves almost our entire 4,000 nautical mile passage.

I say he because everyone on the boat was convinced that any bird visiting the girl’s cabin had to be male.  I pointedly ignored Zeus comments.

Umidori2 300x225 Breakwater Breakfast BurritosI had wondered how on earth these birds managed to make it so terribly far from land without rest.  We were thousands of miles away from any land.  Maybe that was the reason the little guy made his way into my cabin.  He just needed a break.  With a long curving beak and clear dark eyes I wondered what kind of bird my new friend was.  I did want to make sure he was okay.  It was night, but he seemed far too sedate to be entirely healthy.

I took a towel out of the bathroom cupboard and covered the bird, and scooped him into my arms.  He weighed less than air as I carried him outside.  He didn’t struggle or put up the least bit of resistance to my moving him.  I was worried.  Had he hurt himself on his way inside Umineko?  Was he sick?  Wild animals tended to avoid humans like the plague unless they are sick.

 

Umidori on deck 300x225 Breakwater Breakfast BurritosSetting him on a bench I filled a small bowl with fresh water and placed it in front of our visitor.  He didn’t pay a bit of attention to it** nor did the flying fish I offered have any effect.

After 10 minutes he got down off of the bench and moved into the saloon.  He tucked in behind the table and made his way into the darkest shadowy corner he could find, away from the red light in the saloon.

“Maybe just needs to rest,” Toshi San suggested.  “He wants to go somewhere that’s quiet.”

At 5:45 the faintest hints of light brushed the Eastern horizon.  Dawn was on its way.  I went inside with the towel.  I didn’t want dawn to come and the bird to start flying around the boat.  It was vital to get him out when it was still dark.

He wasn’t in the saloon.  He wasn’t on the port side, I peered down the dark steps to the starboard side.  There he was, a darker pool in a darker shadow resting at the bottom of the two stairs.  Directly in front of Mori San’s berth.  I breathed a sigh of relief that Mori San hadn’t needed to use the head and accidently stepped on our guest.

xbreakfast burrito egg cheese 300x225 Breakwater Breakfast BurritosThis time when I draped the red towel over him he struggled.  I smiled as he tried to stretch his wings and placed him on the back of the port side bench.  After a few minutes he hopped down to the bench, and then thought better of it.  My heart soared as he flapped his way back up to the ledge.  A few minutes more and he disappeared into the dissipating night.  He had just needed a place to rest.

Finding a bird in your cabin is fun, always provided you don’t step on it.  On the flip side spent the next day cleaning up er… presents our friend had left.

I love breakfast burritos.  They are healthy, tasty, and meet the requirements of sailing food:  Easy and portable.  Even better, they don’t require complicated ingredients.  If you have leftover rice or beans from the night before they’re a fantastic way to use up ingredients.

 

Breakwater Breakfast Burritos

Ingredients:

  • xbreakfast burrito filling 300x225 Breakwater Breakfast Burritos4 tortillas
  • 4 eggs
  • 4 slices of cheese (or 8 small slices)
  • 2 c rice
  • 2 c black eyed peas (soaked and cooked)
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 2 T taco seasoning
  • Salsa
  • Oil

 

 

Directions:

  • Crack egg into nonstick skillet over medium heat
  • Immediately lay tortilla over egg squish around so that tortilla is coated in egg
  • Allow to cook 2 minutes and flip onto plate
  • Fry garlic in oil for 2 minutes
  • Spoon rice and black eyed peas into pan
  • Mix in taco seasoning
  • Put tortilla in clean skillet over medium heat, egg-side up
  • Lay cheese on top
  • Spoon ¼ of mixture onto each of the tortillas
  • Wrap and serve with salsa

xburrito finished 300x225 Breakwater Breakfast Burritos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*When handling wild animals always wrap them in a towel.  This is safer for both of you.

  1. Wild animals don’t know what is happening to them.   More often than not they are terrified of the person holding them and the towel protects you and curbs their movement.
  2. It is terrible to get human scent on the animal.  Often others of its kind will shun it after that
  3. It is some protection from disease

**In retrospect he probably didn’t know what fresh water was!  Sea birds have internal desalination systems so that they can just drink sea water.  There have been numerous times at sea I wished I were built like that.

Fair Winds Flying Fish

xflying fish 300x224 Fair Winds Flying Fish

A scream of stark terror pierced the night.

“What happened!?”  Toshi San was quick to ask.

I tried to forget the memory of the cold, slimy form wriggling between my toes.

You don’t expect to step on a flying fish in the hallway to your cabin.  The hatch hadn’t been open more than a crack, but somehow the creature had found its way in.  They were everywhere.

Like gifts from the sea gods, heaps of flying fish graced our trampoline and deck every morning.   We had so many, Sato San started noting how many fish we’d gotten on the daily log.  Each line had date, Position, how many miles we had left of the total, position, temperature, and number of flying fish noted.

 

 

 

 

 

xdaily log board 300x224 Fair Winds Flying Fish

Daily Log Board

On every other yacht I’d sailed flying fish were thrown over the side.  The ones who crashed harder were cursed for smearing the deck with their scales  (a nightmare to scrub off once you were in port).  Umineko was different.  Once,  I threw one over the side and Sato San gasped in horror.  We can eat those!

 

 

 

 

 

xsally prepares 300x225 Fair Winds Flying Fish

I had never even considered it, but he explained to me he really wanted flying fish for breakfast the next day.  Yup, you heard right.  Breakfast.  Sure,  fish for breakfast may sound strange to Westerners.  I was certainly surprised.  But I am almost always up for trying new things.  After all, why crew on a Japanese boat if you don’t want to expand your culinary expertise and horizons?

And there it was.  Flying fish were on the menu.   But making one type of fish dish is boring.  I had to diversify.  Soon it became a challenge.  What different types of flying fish could I make?

 

 

xcookingff 300x224 Fair Winds Flying FishAfter about a week of flying fish for breakfast Sato San was still gung-ho about the whole thing, but other crew members (whom shall remain nameless) were pleading for a Western breakfast.  Flying fish are quite tasty prepared the right way, but no matter how many variations you make no matter how hard you try they don’t do very well in American-style pancakes.

You cruisers may have never thought about frying up your flying fish, but I highly recommend it.  Fish you don’t even have to hook?  Why not?  The Umineko boys were all about the bigger the fish the better.  I have a different take on things.  The small ones take less work.  Like a lot less.

 

xcookingff2 300x224 Fair Winds Flying FishWhen a flying fish gets to a certain size they grow scales and you can’t eat the bones.  I’m not a huge fan of or expert at descaling and filleting fish.  It’s even more annoying when there are a ton of flying fish to clean.  But the captain liked them.  I got pretty skilled at it, though I still was much happier when the little ones offered themselves up for our breakfast.

As they are a bit of a chore to clean maybe not cooking them every day they appear on the deck, but I definitely recommend giving them a try once or twice.    As I mentioned, I tried quite a  few takes on flying fish, but this was one of my favorite recipes.

Fair Winds Flying Fish Donburi

xflying fish donburi 300x224 Fair Winds Flying FishIngredients:

  • Rice, cooked
  • Pickled veggies  (we use pickled daikon(takuan), kimchee, and whatever other pickles we have)
  • Flying fish, cleaned
  • 2 T butter
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 T soy sauce
  • 1 T mirin (you can substitute 1 T water and 2 t sugar)

 

 

 Directions:

  • xff donburi2 300x224 Fair Winds Flying FishHeat butter in pan over medium heat
  • Fry garlic for 1 minute
  • Add flying fish, skin-side down and cook 2-3 minutes (depending on size)
  • Flip fish and cook another minute
  • Add soy sauce and mirin and cook one more minute
  • Serve over rice with pickles

Falling Off Flying Squid

A flight of something thwacked into our path as we were dinghying across the Bahamian waters.

“What do you think that was?” the captain asked me.

“Flying fish,” I replied.  What else could it be?

“Calamari!” the captain replied, grinning and holding up a small squid.

flying squid 300x224 Falling Off Flying SquidI had never even heard of flying squid before a sail around the Bahamas several years prior, or since.  Until the passage from Panama, that is.  The first day after we passed the Galapagos flying fish started appearing on our trampoline.  Gifts from the sea gods, of course.  The first day there were a few flying fish and one little squid.

Cook them for breakfast, Sato San urged.  The flying fish were alright, but the squid was scrumptious.

“There’ll be 10 squid this morning,”  I said to Toshi San on watch that night.  I didn’t really believe it, but to my delight there was a flock of flying squid on the trampoline as the sun came up.  Not quite 10, but enough for a tasty snack.

That morning for breakfast I served them as a side dish to our usual rice breakfast.  They were delectable, perfectly done.  And what a wonderful addition of fresh food to the provisions!  Unlike catching monstrous tuna or mahi mahi you aren’t eating it for weeks either.

We didn’t have as many flying squid gifts on the trampoline, but they really are delicious.  I highly recommend frying them up if you find them on your deck or trampoline on passage.  You do have to take out the little plastic-y tube

Falling off Flying Squid

Ingredients:

  • fryingflyingsquid 300x224 Falling Off Flying Squid½ lb squid, about 10
  • 2 T soy
  • 1 T cooking sake
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 T butter

 

Directions

  • flying squiddone 300x224 Falling Off Flying SquidClean the squid, they always have a little plastic-y tube inside but they are usually small enough not to have a beak or anything else that needs removal.  Place in small bowl
  • Sprinkle cooking sake over squid (it removes any possible odor)
  • In small frying pan heat butter over medium heat
  • Fry garlic 1-2 minutes
  • Add soy
  • Cook squid 30 seconds on each side, they will plump up a little bit and translucent flesh will turn opaque
  • Put over rice
  • Enjoy!

If you’re going to keep the squid until lunch you might want to refrigerate it.

 

 

South of the Equator Somen

putting makeup on 300x224 South of the Equator SomenThe sailing world is fraught with myths, legends, and tradition.  That it is bad luck have a woman on a boat may have fallen by the wayside (for some at least), but others remain.  In name at least.  Some, like the equator crossing tradition can be a fun way to break up a long passage.

To cross the equator you need the sea god’s permission. There are different takes on it.  Some legends state that newbies, the people who haven’t crossed before,  must perform a ritual.  Others say that the oldest member on board must make the sacrifice, but luckily (for me) Sato San decided that the newbies had to come up with the skit.

 

 

xequator crossing wsally 300x225 South of the Equator SomenRather than doing an actual skit we agreed that we would do a picture skit.  Each scene would be a still shot and the pictures would say everything.  No memorizing lines, no action.  Just implied action.  Apparently this kind of thing was extremely popular in Japan.

Toshi San and I thought about it for a few days.  Cross dressing and nudity were common in these ceremonies.  I vetoed removing any of my clothes, or wearing a coconut bra or Brazilian string bikini the guys had been suggesting.  Cross dressing on the other hand… now that was a definite possibility.  And who better than to dress up as a woman than Sato San, the biggest advocate of me wearing less clothes.

 

 

 

killing mermaid 2 300x225 South of the Equator SomenHere’s how our story went:

The winds had died because we needed to ask the sea god’s permission to cross the equator.  The sea god needed a sacrifice.

One sailor catches a beautiful mermaid (as played by Sato San) and decides to give her to the sea god to marry.

One sailor prepares the mermaid for the marriage but gets jealous that the mermaid is marrying a god so calls in  her friend in Pacific Al Quanaika (the word means “where it is” in Japanese, but Toshi San wanted it as a play on Al Qaeda) who stabs the mermaid

 

xmermaid sato san 300x225 South of the Equator SomenThe sea god appears saying he doesn’t want his beautiful mermaid hurt or need a sacrifice so he brings her back to life with rum. (this is also a joke as alcohol can be used to kill fish)

The sea god brings the wind and everyone happily sings a song.

It must have worked.  Not half an hour later a pod of 7 small whales, possibly pilot whales breached alongside of us.  I was delighted watching the creatures surfaces so close to the hull.  Sato San, on the other hand just wanted them gone.  They weren’t big, only 2-3 times the size of a dolphin, with curious rounded heads and dark bodies.

When Toshi San made the joke about whale steaks I knew the gentle giants must not have seen the Japanese flag.

 

xcrossing equator 300x225 South of the Equator SomenOne of our favorite meals is somen.  It’s quick, easy, and delicious on a hot day, which we get quite a few of in equatorial waters.  Somen isn’t for rough seas, but it’s a great thing to eat on calm waters, at anchor, or in a marina.  Healthy, delicious, and above all easy it’s a fun cool meal for crew to eat together on the deck with a breeze blowing over you.

 

 

 

 

South of the Equator Somen

Ingredients:

  • DSCN0977 300x224 South of the Equator Somen1 500 gram package of somen noodles
  • Tomato, thinly sliced
  • Spring onions, finely chopped
  • ½ carrot, julienned
  • 1 can fish (sardines or Japanese canned fish)
  • ½ cucumber, julienned
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • ¼ c katsuo dipping sauce
  • Wasabi

Instructions:

  • Boil water
  • Put somen in and cook for 2 minutes
  • Drain and run cold water over noodles until cool (it stops the noodles cooking and cools them)
  • Fry eggs in small, oiled pan (ideally square) over medium heat about 2 minutes on one side and flip.
  • Slice egg into very thin slices
  • Arrange egg and veggies on a plate with fish in the middle
  • Set on table with wasabi and katsuo
  • Each person has a little bowl and each person makes their own lunch:
  • Pour katsuo dipping sauce into bowl
  • Stir in wasabi to taste
  • Sprinkle in spring onions
  • Add noodles, veggies and fish
  • Refill bowl and eat until full!

Captain’s Call Rice Cakes

DSCN1158 300x224 Captains Call Rice Cakes

Okay, this was in Panama… we sailed past the Galapagos in the dead of night but hey, islands.

The Galapagos.  Ever since reading the Kurt Vonnegut book I had wanted to sail there.  Almost every cruiser heading through the Panama Canal to the Marquesas stops off at the Galapagos.  It’s the logical stopping-point to break up the prodiigeous 4,000 nautical mile passage.  Sure, it’s a lot closer to Panama, about 845 nautical miles away.  But still, it’s a nice break  to help you remember what land feels like.

Toshi San and I both really wanted to go.  Mori San wouldn’t have minded either (provided there was a post office there, Mori San’s one requirement for visiting even the remotest of locations).  Unfortunately Sato San was dead set against it.  It was costly, there was a lot of paperwork, we might use up too much fuel, and he was in a bit of a hurry to reach Darwin for the start of the Sail Indonesia Rally in July.  Then there were the sea lions.  He’d heard horror stories from our friends in the previous WARC about sea lions climbing up on boats and making their noisy, stinky, aggressive selves at home.

Still, we were sailing within 10 nautical miles of the islands, near enough to smell them, without stopping.  Sadder still our friends on Spirit of Alcides were taking the time to stop and explore the islands.  But as much as Toshi San, Mori San, and I wanted to go, it wasn’t up to us.  Though crew may offer suggestions, a boat is not a democracy.  The captain always has the final say.

Though it can be frustrating, the captain really does have to have complete control of what goes on on a boat (this control does not extend to the galley.  I am captain of my galley.  It helps the boat run smoothly and keeps things together in rough seas or trying times.  Not that the captain has to be a Bligh or anything.  He can listen, but bottom line is that, the captain always has the final say.  Alas this meant I didn’t get to visit the Galapagos this time around.

I was on watch with Toshi San at 3:30 am when we sailed by.  Oh there was joking about “accidently” going off course and ending up there but no.   No giant turtles or blue footed boobies for us.  Not this time. I guess I have to save something for next time around.

DSCN1212 300x224 Captains Call Rice CakesThat morning we had left-over rice from the night before.  Rice is integral in Japanese cooking.    From the start Sato San made it clear that at least one meal of the day should be accompanied by rice.  I usually cook just the right amount.  But what happens when you make too much rice?

Growing up one of my favorite left over breakfasts was rice cakes.  Now “rice cake” can mean so many different things.  Of course there are the Styrofoam-like “healthy” rice cakes.  You know, the ones that taste like nothing unless they are flavored with some salt or seasoning?  Then there are Korean rice cakes which are similar to Japanese mochi.  These dense cylinders of  rice flour pressed into a chewy pasta are used in one of my favorite dishes, dduk boki.

 

These rice cakes are completely different.  They are more like rice pancakes.  They make an easy and tasty breakfast not to mention being  a wonderful way of using up left-over rice from the night before.

 

 

Captain’s Call Rice Cakes

Ingredients:

  • DSCN1211 300x225 Captains Call Rice Cakes3 c cooked rice
  • ¼ c spring onions, finely chopped
  • ½ c canned corn
  • ½ c fake crab meat, chopped (optional)
  • 2 T Vegeta seasoning
  • 4 eggs
  • Oil for frying
  • Okonomayaki sauce (optional)

Directions:

  • Put rice in large bowl
  • Mix in eggs, corn, fake crab meat, and vegeta
  • Scoop onto oiled skillet with ladle
  • Cook in oiled skillet over medium heat until golden, 2-3 minutes on each side
  • Serve hot

rice cake with okonomayaki 300x224 Captains Call Rice Cakes

Jettison Japanese Curry

ship2 300x225 Jettison Japanese CurryIt was dark when we set sail.  Of course we had meant to leave during the day, but as with many of the best laid plans, this one fell by the wayside.

I was preparing dinner when the police boat sped up to us.  Who were we?  Where were we heading?, the officer wanted to know.  Did we have permission to go past La Playita?

I apologized and explained as calmly as I could that sailing vessel Umineko was were setting sail for the Marquesas. We had not known that we required permission.  Would it be possible for us to continue on our course?

The officer seemed flustered but I apologized profusely.  He told us to be absolutely sure not to go past La Playita without informing them 24-hours in advance ever again.  I gave him my word that I would never be so inconsiderate again and that seemed to placate him.  We had to be careful of a few ships that night but it was a pretty quiet night so everything would be okay.

Moon 300x224 Jettison Japanese CurryI thanked him again and got off the VHF radio and  back to dinner preparations in the galley.

One of our go-to meals on Umineko is Japanese curry.  When I joined Umineko I loved Indian curry and Thai curry, but I’d never even heard of Japanese curry.  Well apparently Japanese curry is one of the most popular every-day Japanese dishes.

Though extremely popular curry isn’t technically a traditional Japanese dish.  Toshi San explained that British colonists brought curry back on their way from India.  Though curry itself isn’t traditionally Japanese they have made it their own.  Japanese curry isn’t as spicy as many Indian or Thai curries.  Another uniquely Japanese twist is that it is invariably served with fukujinzuke, a sweet pickle mixture.  Well, invariably served on Umineko at least.

Jettison Japanese Curry

Ingredients:Japanese curry 300x224 Jettison Japanese Curry

  • 4 squares Golden Curry
  • 750 ml (2 ½ cups) water
  • 1 carrot, sliced (thick slices)
  • 1 potato, halved and coarsely chopped
  • 1 onion, coarsely chopped
  • 4 eggs
  • 3 cups rice
  • 1 T vegetable oil
  • Fukujinzuke (optional)

 

Directions:

  • Cook rice
  • In deep skillet, sauté onions in oil  over medium heat
  • Add potato and carrot and cook for 5 minutes
  • Pour in 500 ml water and simmer for 10 minutes
  • Stir in curry squares (broken up) until dissolved
  • Cook another 5 minutes slowly adding remaining water
  • Crack eggs Into curry and cook for an additional minute
  • Serve steaming hot beside rice
  • Enjoy!

Jettison Japanese Curry

ship2 300x225 Jettison Japanese CurryIt was dark when we set sail.  Of course we had meant to leave during the day, but as with many of the best laid plans, this one fell by the wayside.

I was preparing dinner when the police boat sped up to us.  Who were we?  Where were we heading?, the officer wanted to know.  Did we have permission to go past La Playita?

I apologized and explained as calmly as I could that sailing vessel Umineko was were setting sail for the Marquesas. We had not known that we required permission.  Would it be possible for us to continue on our course?

The officer seemed flustered but I apologized profusely.  He told us to be absolutely sure not to go past La Playita without informing them 24-hours in advance ever again.  I gave him my word that I would never be so inconsiderate again and that seemed to placate him.  We had to be careful of a few ships that night but it was a pretty quiet night so everything would be okay.

Moon 300x224 Jettison Japanese CurryI thanked him again and got off the VHF radio and  back to dinner preparations in the galley.

One of our go-to meals on Umineko is Japanese curry.  When I joined Umineko I loved Indian curry and Thai curry, but I’d never even heard of Japanese curry.  Well apparently Japanese curry is one of the most popular every-day Japanese dishes.

Though extremely popular curry isn’t technically a traditional Japanese dish.  Toshi San explained that British colonists brought curry back on their way from India.  Though curry itself isn’t traditionally Japanese they have made it their own.  Japanese curry isn’t as spicy as many Indian or Thai curries.  Another uniquely Japanese twist is that it is invariably served with fukujinzuke, a sweet pickle mixture.  Well, invariably served on Umineko at least.

Jettison Japanese Curry

Ingredients:Japanese curry 300x224 Jettison Japanese Curry

  • 4 squares Golden Curry
  • 750 ml (2 ½ cups) water
  • 1 carrot, sliced (thick slices)
  • 1 potato, halved and coarsely chopped
  • 1 onion, coarsely chopped
  • 4 eggs
  • 3 cups rice
  • 1 T vegetable oil
  • Fukujinzuke (optional)

 

Directions:

  • Cook rice
  • In deep skillet, sauté onions in oil  over medium heat
  • Add potato and carrot and cook for 5 minutes
  • Pour in 500 ml water and simmer for 10 minutes
  • Stir in curry squares (broken up) until dissolved
  • Cook another 5 minutes slowly adding remaining water
  • Crack eggs Into curry and cook for an additional minute
  • Serve steaming hot beside rice
  • Enjoy!

Passage Preparation Sweet Potato Pockets

preparation 300x224 Passage Preparation Sweet Potato Pockets

Have food prepared for the first few days of passage

Thar be dragons!

I’ve loved dragons ever since I was a little girl.  It might be date back to seeing the Magic Flute at age 3 or my fascination with dinosaurs.  Perhaps even reading Anne McCaffery’s dragon rider series.  It only seems fitting that maps of old stated “Thar be dragons!” in uncharted territory.

There are those who have wondered why I’m embarking on a month-long passage from Panama City to the Marquesas.  Of course I am interested to see what it will be like not seeing land for almost a month.  After all, this is almost twice the distance of my longest passage to date.  But for me pushing boundaries is part of the fun.  Just the thought of the adventures that lay around the corner or over the horizon makes my breath quicken and my heart flutter. Some part of me could just be hoping to find those dragons.

 

Pocket2 300x225 Passage Preparation Sweet Potato PocketsWhatever the case, for a month long passage more than a little preparation and provisioning is required.  I can’t lie and tell you that the galley is always my favorite place to be.  The first few days of a passage after a long time in port can be brutal.   Standing on watch?  No problem, but if the winds are against you and the sea is a washing machine concentrating on preparing meals in the stuffy galley is grim.  And imagining what flavors and what tastes combine to make a culinary masterpiece or sampling the food to see if it needs more salt?  Forget it.

I rely on a couple simple rules of thumb cut down my time in the galley on the first few days of passage.  After that you’ll get your galley legs.

-          Chop vegetables in advance.  Not only does this cut down on time in the galley, but if the seas are rough or you’re feeling miserable wielding a knife may not be the first thing you want.

-          Use tried and true simple recipes you know.  Thinking about what you’re cooking is not the best thing for settling a touchy stomach.

-          Prepare a few dishes in advance that require minimal effort to prepare.  Some of my favorites are pastys or pocket ‘zas.

 

Pre-Passage Sweet Potato Feta Pockets

Ingredients:

  • Pockets 3 300x225 Passage Preparation Sweet Potato Pockets½  recipe passage maker pizza dough
  • 3 T olive oil
  • sweet potato, chopped
  • ½ onion, diced
  • 1 t salt
  • ½ t freshly ground pepper
  • 1 t oregano
  • ½ c feta
  • 1 egg, beaten (optional

 

 

Directions:

  • Fry  onion in oil in large skillet over medium heat for about 2 minutesPockets4 300x225 Passage Preparation Sweet Potato Pockets
  • Add sweet potato and seasonings stir until coated in oil
  • Cover and cook another 15 minutes until sweet potato is cooked but firm
  • Separate dough into tangerine-sized balls
  • Roll each ball into circle using rolling pin or wine bottle
  • Spoon sweet potato mixture onto center of dough
  • Fold circle over into crescent
  • Brush with egg (optional)

Passagemaker Pizza Dough

grissini dough with rolling pin 1024x768 Passagemaker Pizza DoughPizza is a favorite among yachties and land-lovers around the world.  Sure, if you are lazy you can bring store-bought crusts or pizza crust mixes (yeah, I didn’t know mixes existed either until one boat I crewed on had a stock of pizza dough mix.) but let’s face it.  Making your own pizza always tastes a thousand times better. Cheese may be a commodity on long passages, but saving a bit for a pizza night once and a while can boost morale immeasurably.

This is my all-time favorite pizza dough recipe.  Simple enough to make under way, it’s packed with flavor.  Putting the Italian seasoning in the actual crust makes all the difference.  It is leagues better than any pizza crust I’ve had in a pizzeria.  I use this recipe for grissini, and all types of pizza from oven baked to the nautical stand-by pan-fried, and it works like a charm.

Passage Maker Pizza Dough

1 large pizza

Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ t of yeast
  • 1 t sugar
  • 2 T pizza seasoning or Italian seasoning
  • 2 c flour
  • ½ t salt
  • ⅛ C olive oil
  • ¾ c warm water

Directions:

  • Mix yeast in warm water and teaspoon sugar and allow to proof 10 minutesDSCN8693 1024x768 Passagemaker Pizza Dough
  • Mix dry ingredients together
  • Make a hole in center and add water and olive oil
  • mix in with spoon
  • When too thick kneed with hands for 5 minutes
  • Cover with damp towel
  • Allow to rise 30 min
  • Punch down and roll out into circle or rectangle  with rolling pin or I like to use a wine bottle
  • Cover with toppings

 

IMG 1453 300x225 Passagemaker Pizza Dough

Charter Chirashi Sushi

DSCN1054 300x225 Charter Chirashi SushiThe barter system is still thriving in the sailing community.  One of my favorite trades was on Elephant Island in San Blas.  I traded some banana bread for a winch handle.  I was delighted with my side, but the Australian couple seemed equally pleased with their banana bread.  The woman even threw in some clothes she liked the bread so much!  That isn’t quite the norm though.

At Shelter Bay marina by Colon, Panama was a party every night.  Not only were the fabulous people from WARC 2014 there, but as with most marinas there were interesting people living on many of the boats.  We befriended one megayacht’s crew, a young South African  surfer and a wry Brit.  They had caught an enormous tuna a few days earlier and asked me if I wanted any of the meat.

 

I jumped on the offer and told them that I would cook them dinner with it.  This kind of barter on boats is a lot more common.  Very few yachts have a ton of freezer space and even fewer have a flash freezer.  When a crew of four catches a 20-lb tuna you’re a) going to be eating a lot of tuna for a while and b) will have to give away at least some of it if you don’t want to throw it away.

This leads to quite a few presents and exchanges of fish between yachties.  And if you’re given fish it only makes sense to cook it for your patron.

What could we do with delicious fresh tuna though?  Sashimi was an option, of course, but that was more of a starter.  We needed something for a lovely dinner party.

I first tried chirashi sushi, or chirashizushi in Argentina when my lovely friend Machiko invited me over for dinner.   I fell in love with it from the first bite.  Chirashizushi means “scattered” sushi and it is also a favorite in Japanese home cooking.  Since then I have tried chirashi sushi in a restaurant, rice with decadent slabs of sashimi, but I really prefer the homemade variety.

It isn’t hard to make, and like so many Japanese dishes it looks beautiful.  If you bring chirashi sushi you will be sure to be the hit of the dinner party.

 

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Serves 6

 

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups short grained or sushi rice
  • 1 packet Tamanoi Sushinoko sushi rice seasoning powder
  • 3 lbs fresh tuna (3-days old is ideal)
  • Pickled daikon, thinly sliced or shredded
  • Nori, cut into thin strips
  • Kazimi ginger (pink pickled ginger in thin strips)
  • 2 eggs

 

 

Directions:

 

  • Cook rice
  • Spread in large bowl,  and fan to cool
  • Gently fold in sushi rice seasoning powder using flat rice spoon
  • You shouldn’t make the sushi rice so far in advance that you need to refrigerate it.  In fact, it should never be refrigerated.  The ideal sushi rice is served at body temperature.
  • Spread on a flat platter
  • Beat the eggs and cook 2 minutes over medium heat in small square skillet if you have one.  A small skillet will do.
  • Flip and cook the other side about 1 minute
  • Turn onto cutting board and cut into thin strips (it’s called tamagoyaki)
  • Cut fish into bite-sized chunks
  • Arrange fish, kazami ginger, tamagoyaki, nori strips, and pickled daikon strips over rice
  • Serve and enjoy!

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